Category double albums

SINGING SONGS ABOUT THE SOUTHLAND: The Drive-By Truckers Raise A Ruckus

“All these years and lineup changes later, the song of DBT’s improbable start remains the same. But like all good yarns, it’s a story that bears retelling, because it’s about fate and fortune and famine, and a terrific rock & roll band whose defining moment almost didn’t happen.”

Advertisements

RPM: Life In Analog Now Spinning On Google+!

In the spirit of Throwback Thursday (although, truth be told, we’re throwin’ it back pretty much every day of the week here), I invite you to check out a sample of some of my rarer records and vintage music memorabilia being posted and catalogued on an ongoing basis at my brand-spankin’ new “RPM: Life In Analog” Google+ […]

THE TIES THAT BIND: The Timeless River That Runs Through Bruce Springsteen’s America

The best way to understand why Bruce Springsteen matters to his audience, and the American cultural landscape in general, is to turn to the man himself. Throughout his career, it has been virtually impossible to separate the rock star from the hippie kid who grew up in Freehold, New Jersey and the populist songwriter whose lyrics owe as much to John Steinbeck and Woody Guthrie as Bob Dylan and Chuck Berry

SOUTHERN EXPOSURE: The Drive-By Truckers Roll From Darkness To Daylight And Hit The Road Behind A New Live Album

The band’s 2001 landmark, ‘Southern Rock Opera,’ caught on with a broad audience that included hipsters and college kids, aging classic rockers, and ordinary folks who loved the sound of loud electric guitars set to lyrics that meant something. Both album and band also fared far better in the North and West than the group’s home turf: “The South is our weakest region – I think it’s because it’s too close to home,” said bandleader Patterson Hood. “We’re singing about stuff that’s right down the street. And nobody wants to hear that.”

STILL REIGNING, STILL DREAMING: Jimi Hendrix Producer Eddie Kramer On The Making Of A Legend

“Jimi was so shy,” Kramer says. “He never said a word in the beginning. He was very polite, very reserved, but once he plugged in and started playing I realized, ‘this is pretty special’. I had heard a couple of singles he had done, but hearing him playing right there in the same room was a whole different ball game. But very quickly, once I established the sound that he liked, we got on extremely well and we could communicate – even though he would describe sounds to me as colors, like, ‘Man, I want it to sound kinda purple, you know what I mean, man?’ And I would come up with a sound that was purple. We inspired each other …”

STILL A BEAUTIFUL BUZZ: Strolling Down Exile On Main Street

Coinciding with the deluxe reissue a few years back of the Rolling Stones’ “Exile On Main St.”, I pitched a piece to The Boston Globe on what that blearily beautiful sprawling double album meant to me growing up amid corporate FM radio of the late 1970s and early ’80s, and how it (and the Stones) helped […]

nudisc

A music blog. rock. punk. garage. power pop. vinyl. cd. dvd. bluray. books.

The Department of Tangents

Conversations About Comedy, Music, and Horror

The Baseball Bloggess

Loves the 4-6-3 and the Serial Comma.

Let there be Elvis

Just another story for the great heap

Coco Crisp's Afro

A celebration of the past and future of Oakland A's baseball.... with a Rock N Roll/East Bay rebellious spirit and a sense of humor.

Interesting Literature

A Library of Literary Interestingness

voicesoftimedotcom

A topnotch WordPress.com site

allabouteighteen

Boston is a Brotherhood

Cardboard Gods

Voice of the Mathematically Eliminated

interrupting my train of thought

a website about a book by phil dellio